Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Doors of Spoleto




I had the exquisite pleasure of singing in Spoleto, Italy, last summer with the Umbrian Serenades and am happy to report that I will be returning again this summer. (If you'd like to go, you need to apply ASAP.) What a magical experience! While there, I found myself snapping pictures of doorways. After I got home, a friend remembered seeing a book on the doors of Umbria. "Really?" I said. "Great minds think alike!" There are an infinite number of doorways, each one different than the other, no two being exactly alike. I can't wait to find new ones.











8 comments:

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    1. Thank you for your comment, Designers Muse!

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  2. A wonderful deflection of the reader's delight by yet another; I must seriously try to do that, although I doubt that I'd have the fortitude to conduct the exercise on behalf of modesty. :) Seriously, the first note could have been sustained just a little bit longer, because it is very lovely to wander into a contemplation of singing in Spoleto. But, never mind, off we go, to extract the textures of the town, and this was surely a treasurable justification for that excursion. A previous generation of a family of cousins of mine led a very cosmpolitan life, somewhat hard on the children (my peers), but full of amenities of discovery. Wherever they moved -- Vevey, Greenwich, Toronto, St Helena -- they would build a new house, with a beautiful door they had selected from previous travels. Not the least of the reasons I did love to visit them.

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    1. Thank you for your comment Laurent. If you are so inclined: I've written quite a bit about singing in Spoleto on my other blog VoiceTalk. Here are the relevant posts.

      http://www.voice-talk.net/search/label/umbrian%20serenades

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  3. My husband's nonna lives behind a door just like the one in picture number 6 - in fact I wonder if that's her door? Spoleto, for all it's beauty, is unfortunately becoming a ghost town - at least the old town is, and it's feared all of these homes will one day be foreign owned once the town is "discovered". It is a gorgeous place.

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    1. Thank you for your comment, Sherry. Spoleto has been known internationally since Menotti began the "Festival of Two Worlds." In that sense, it has already been "discovered," no? I will be returning in July for the the Umbrian Serenades. And you are right, it is an unbelievably gorgeous place.

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  4. Yes, it's been known for the festival, but tourism is the only industry the town has at the moment and for better or worse, it's not just the festival attracting tourists anymore. It's great for those who still manage to keep businesses open in the old town but slowly those are closing and properties are lovely but increasingly empty. The house my husband was born in now has foreign owners and the locals do feel it's only a matter of time - Tuscany being out of reach for many. Although considering the state of the global economy, this may be in doubt. This is a belief and a worry that the old town will be empty empty in the next few decades.
    Enjoy your trip. Have you been to the library? It's absolutely gorgeous. One of my favorite places in the town.

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    1. Thank you for your comment, Sherry! I have not been to the library that I remember, but will certainly do so when I return/ Thank you for suggesting it!

      I did notice a lot of building and renovation last summer, so I can understand your argument regarding gentrification. Though, as you note, a depressed global economy may keep this at bay. I myself did notice a change since having first been in the old town in 1985. It's much more hip- for lack of a bette word. Whether this is progress is anyone's guess. It do think, however, that the Spoletini will resist (I hope) the more crass elements of modernity.

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